The Beginning Of The End
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9 Of The Top 10 Occupations In America Pay An Average Wage Of Less Than $35,000 A Year

CashierAccording to stunning new numbers just released by the federal government, nine of the top ten most commonly held jobs in the United States pay an average wage of less than $35,000 a year.  When you break that down, that means that most of these workers are making less than $3,000 a month before taxes.  And once you consider how we are being taxed into oblivion, things become even more frightening.  Can you pay a mortgage and support a family on just a couple grand a month?  Of course not.  In the old days, a single income would enable a family to live a very comfortable middle class lifestyle in most cases.  But now those days are long gone.  In 2014, both parents are expected to work, and in many cases both of them have to get multiple jobs just in order to break even at the end of the month.  The decline in the quality of our jobs is a huge reason for the implosion of the middle class in this country.  You can't have a middle class without middle class jobs, and we have witnessed a multi-decade decline in middle class jobs in the United States.  As long as this trend continues, the middle class is going to continue to shrink.

The following is a list of the most commonly held jobs in America according to the federal government.  As you can see, 9 of the top 10 most commonly held occupations pay an average wage of less than $35,000 a year...

  1. Retail salespersons, 4.48 million workers earning  $25,370
  2. Cashiers  3.34 million workers earning $20,420
  3. Food prep and serving staff, 3.02 million workers earning $18,880
  4. General office clerk, 2.83 million working earning $29,990
  5. Registered nurses, 2.66 million workers earning $68,910
  6. Waiters and waitresses, 2.40 million workers earning $20,880
  7. Customer service representatives, 2.39 million workers earning $33,370
  8. Laborers, and freight and material movers, 2.28 million workers earning $26,690
  9. Secretaries and admins (not legal or medical),  2.16 million workers earning $34,000
  10. Janitors and cleaners (not maids),  2.10 million workers earning, $25,140

Overall, an astounding 59 percent of all American workers bring home less than $35,000 a year in wages.

So if you are going to make more than $35,000 this year, you are solidly in the upper half.

But that doesn't mean that you will always be there.

More Americans are falling out of the middle class with each passing day.

Just consider the case of a 47-year-old woman named Kristina Feldotte.  Together with her husband, they used to make about $80,000 a year.  But since she lost her job three years ago, their combined income has fallen to about $36,000 a year...

Three years ago, Kristina Feldotte, 47, and her husband earned a combined $80,000. She considered herself solidly middle class. The couple and their four children regularly vacationed at a lake near their home in Saginaw, Michigan.

But in August 2012, Feldotte was laid off from her job as a special education teacher. She's since managed to find only part-time teaching work. Though her husband still works as a truck salesman, their income has sunk by more than half to $36,000.

"Now we're on the upper end of lower class," Feldotte said.

There is a common assumption out there that if you "have a job" that you must be doing "okay".

But that is not even close to the truth.

The reality of the matter is that you can even have two or three jobs and still be living in poverty.  In fact, you can even be working for the government or the military and still need food stamps...

Since the start of the Recession, the dollar amount of food stamps used at military commissaries, special stores that can be used by active-duty, retired, and some veterans of the armed forces has quadrupled, hitting $103 million last year. Food banks around the country have also reported a rise in the number of military families they serve, numbers that swelled during the Recession and haven’t, or have barely, abated.

There are so many people that are really hurting out there.

Today, someone wrote to me about one of my recent articles about food price increases and told me about how produce prices were going through the roof in that particular area.  This individual wondered how ordinary families were going to be able to survive in this environment.

That is a very good question.

I don't know how they are going to survive.

In some cases, the suffering that is going on behind closed doors is far greater than any of us would ever imagine.

And often, it is children that suffer the most...

A Texas couple kept their bruised, malnourished 5-year-old son in a diaper and locked in a closet of their Spring home, police said in a horrifying case of abuse.

The tiny, blond-haired boy was severely underweight, his shoulder blades, ribs and vertebrae showing through his skin, when officers found him late last week.

You can see some photos of that poor little boy right here.

I hope that those abusive parents are put away for a very long time.

Sadly, there are lots of kids that are really suffering right now.  There are more than a million homeless schoolchildren in America, and there are countless numbers that will go to bed hungry tonight.

But if you live in wealthy enclaves on the east or west coasts, all of this may sound truly bizarre to you.  Where you live, you may look around and not see any poverty at all.  That is because America has become increasingly segregated by wealth.  Some are even calling this the "skyboxification of America"...

The richest Americans—the much-talked about 1 percent—are a cloistered class. As the Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz scathingly put it, they “have the best houses, the best educations, the best doctors, and the best lifestyles, but there is one thing that money doesn’t seem to have bought: an understanding that their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live.” The Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel has similarly lamented the “skyboxification” of American life, in which “people of affluence and people of modest means lead increasingly separate lives.”

The substantial and growing gap between the rich and everyone else is increasingly inscribed on our geography. There have always been affluent neighborhoods, gated enclaves, and fabled bastions of wealth like Greenwich, Connecticut; Grosse Pointe, Michigan; Potomac, Maryland; and Beverly Hills, California. But America’s bankers, lawyers, and doctors didn’t always live so far apart from teachers, accountants, and small business owners, who themselves weren’t always so segregated from the poorest, most struggling Americans.

Nobody should talk about an "economic recovery" until the middle class starts growing again.

Even as the stock market has soared to unprecedented heights over the past year, the decline of middle class America has continued unabated.

And most Americans know deep inside that something is deeply broken.  For example, a recent CNBC All-America Economic Survey found that over 80 percent of all Americans consider the economy to be "fair" or "poor".

Yes, for the moment things are going quite well for the top 10 percent of the nation, but that won't last long either.  None of the problems that caused the last great financial crisis have been fixed.  In fact, they have gotten even worse.  We are steamrolling toward another great financial crisis and our leaders are absolutely clueless.

When the next crisis strikes, the economic suffering in this nation is going to get even worse.

As bad as things are now, they are not even worth comparing to what is coming.

So I hope that you are getting prepared.  Time is running out.

 

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  • libsstillsucktheobamacock

    thanks gary!

  • wk

    I work In retail while I am going to collage, luckily It is a sporting goods store so I can get good deal on ammo to stock up on.
    Everyone I work with are so out of it, they do not prepare for what is comming.

    • dooder

      They will be the first ones coming through your windows.

  • jakartaman

    I have been prepping for awhile
    I am actually surprised that our economy is still working and has not collapsed – I guess 85Billion a month helps prop it up for awhile. – That said It is right around the corner – Just don’t know what will be the straw that will will crash it

    • Guest

      I’m with you. I’m amazed that it has continued this long.

      • MichaelfromTheEconomicCollapse

        We should be thankful that this period of relative stability has lasted this long.

        Michael

    • Hammerstrike

      US dollar being the world trade currency, its collapse would cause worldwide disruption of trade and thus China and other keeps “lending” (lending that won´t be repaid) to prevent that from happening, that is why.

      The funny thing is that while the schemes of the bankers kept living standards high (and still does), it gutted the productive economic sectors, like manufacture.

    • Drud

      I’m right there with you. When I first started reading about the Fed, fiat currencies, the Deep State, etc (~4 years ago now) I was sure the system was going to hit a brick wall within a month, not because I am a crazy Chicken Little type, but because I understand the math and the numbers are just that bad. Over the past few years, I have come to doubt the very notion of collapse countless times (some very recently). The reason for this doubt is very simple: everything still works fine. i can go over to Costco (or any of a thousand other store) hand them a little square of plastic and walk out with massive amounts of all types of goods, in complete peace. I then walk out to the parking lot and make the three mile journey home in minutes. At home I have clean, hot-and-cold running water, natural gas and electricity piped in, endless entertainment options on TV and instantaneous access to almost all the information humanity has every recorded. Not only that, if I get tired of my home, I can drive to the airport and within 24 hours be anywhere in the world (again using nothing but a little square of plastic as remuneration for the service). This lifestyle is something that the Pharaohs of old could not dream of, and not only because of the technological advances involved, but also because of the decadence involved. I can imagine a 11-year-old King Tut coming forward in time and saying “Boy, you guys got it made, but you sure are lazy.” Now, obviously, my lifestyle is very middle-class American (at least for now) and I would (and will) miss these convenience if (when) they were taken away. But, am I alone and am I justified, in lamenting my dependence upon these conveniences? Were not past generations better off in there ignorance of even the possibility of such decadence? I have no definitive answers for these questions but I do give them some thought from time to time.

    • Priszilla

      You need to buy things to prep?
      That’s keeping the economy up.

      And just look at the gun owners buying more guns and ammo.

      The car owners using fuel.
      The climate change deniers buying oil and coal and timber to heat their homes.

      And the government still making war, the NSA buying computers and stethoscopes to listen on your bedroom walls.

  • Rodster

    It’s only going to get worse as we set sail towards the global monetary reset. It’s almost as if this is all being done on purpose….oh wait!

  • K

    This is the price of stupidity. We vote for people who promise much, and deliver nothing. And then we do it again, over and over. We are handed a gift called the U.S., and we are too stupid to cherish it. But then again how could we cherish it, most of us never even understood it. Your liberties, paid for by the blood of true patriots. You loose more of them each passing day, but you do not even notice. Why, most of you never even knew you had them. Now finally they decide to cut your throat financially, why are you surprised? You have let them get away with everything else. 80% of the people in this Country, are getting just what they deserve. But there is a funny thing about stupidity. You can decide to stop being stupid, anytime.

    • jakartaman

      I disagree with your last statement,
      Stupidity is an incurable disease.
      Obama will leave office but we will still have 51% low IQ voters.

      • K

        Our experiences differ. I have always found people could learn, once it was important to them. The sad thing, is how few consider it important.

      • Hammerstrike

        Only until Natural Selection is put back on its tracks.

        • nekksys

          There is a difference between Stupidity and Ignorance.

          Ignorance is simply not knowing and it can be cured through education and mentoring. That’s why the Guild system we had centuries ago cranked out some of the finest artisans we’ve ever known.

          Stupidity, on the other hand, is incurable. It is a disease of the intellect which says, “I know better but I don’t care and I’m going to do anyway.” That’s why we have repeat offenders who keep going back to jail every few months or years because they won’t put aside Self in order to learn and grow.

          • opinionsoutloud

            What if the repeat offenders are repeating the offense because they can’t find a job? In America, nobody is ever square with the house, nor are they forgiven, by a country that claims to be Christian. Certain rights are taken away forever, even if someone has served their time. Why does America place so many people in jail/prison anyway? Some sources say America puts mot people in prison than other countries even though America’s population is much smaller. Does that make sense in “the most free country in the world?”

            Isn’t it interesting that many Christians believe they get forgiveness, yet those same people will not forgive others. Isn’t it interesting how many Christians exalt those with a degree over those that are uneducated, even though they claim to worship a God that is no respector of persons, and God’s son that came as a blue collar carpenter? I remember something in the Bible asking “Did you visit me in prison?” I wonder how many Christians visit those in prison? Furthermore, how many people in the Bible were in prison at some point in their lives?

          • nekksys

            If an offender keeps going back to jail, it is because they aren’t growing as a person. Even if they can’t find a job or are hungry or whatever. It makes no difference the reason why they keep being incarcerated. If you can’t find a job, find a way to create one. (I’ve done this before and will continue to do so to end dependence on someone else for my livelihood.) If you’re hungry, speak to a church or food pantry or even learn to grow your own food. (Same thing… Growing a garden takes work and knowledge; both are free to someone who’s willing to make the effort.)

            My step-son has been to prison and has “kept his nose clean” since before he got out. He created his own job and helps me where he can.

            BTW, nice way to try to turn the discussion. Too bad you failed. To answer some of your posits; several people I know visit those imprisoned. I, on the other hand, choose to garden and stock my church pantry from my excess.

            And isn’t it interesting how some loud-mouth, non-Christians can spout such vitriolic rhetoric without a keen and clear understanding of Scripture?

      • Drud

        Two things I see way too much of here are blame and name-calling. Both are very much human, especially when people are angry (and rightfully so). The problem is, they accomplish nothing, except to poison one’ soul and harden one’s heart. I am guilty of both far more often than I care to admit, but I try to recognize this in myself and correct it. The point is, if a person is “stupid”, meaning genuinely lacking the cognitive ability to understand complex topics, should we condemn them, dismiss them, hate them? If someone is ignorant, well, either they have just not been exposed to the truth (should anyone be condemned for this?), or they have willfully chosen to ignore facts to support their own world view. This is the most difficult case to deal with, and there are a lot of these people out there, but we must realize that we ALL do this everyday. We must also realize that we are all in this together and everyone will suffer when the system collapses. Another thing about blame: I am very angry about the system (the Deep State) we have in place and the rigged game we are forced to play, but I blame no individual. I fully believe that most people in power have made and continue to make bad decisions with the best intentions (at first) and find themselves painted in a corner later on. Even those psychopaths out there in positions of power (and I know there are more than a few) well, I believe these people are completely miserable and total slaves to their addiction. This by no means justifies the things they do that cause billions of people to suffer, but it does tend to (mostly) eliminate my feelings of malice towards them, This is a good thing, malice is absolute poison to well-being.

        • ConcernedAmerican

          You are brilliant. Excellent comments and observations.

        • David Horace

          Thank heaven that a little less than 250 years ago, a group of people realized that voting was no longer working, and they weren’t content to just eliminate their feeling of malice towards those in charge.

      • Gay Veteran

        “…Obama will leave office but we will still have 51% low IQ voters.”

        same was true when Bush left office

    • ConcernedAmerican

      Politicians are selected; but not by the voters.

      • dooder

        The game doesn’t change!

      • laura m.

        Politicians are the scum of the earth and was told so decades ago, and I haven’t voted in over three decades. They never worked for a living and are all bought off puppets on all levels of gov.

        • K2

          John F kennedy said..businessmen are the biggest scum on earth.

          In reality its both.

          Outsourcing, regulations, taxes are all a product of Evil businessmen and evil politicians working hand in glove.

          • Hammerstrike

            He was shot, that tells us someone was not happy with what he did as a president.

          • SledDog

            So you hate business people but want a job. Kinda like being pro-egg but anti-chicken.

          • David Horace

            Uh, you wanna give us a source on that JFK quote. He dramatically reduced taxes on business.

        • kfilly

          Politicians, bankers and Lawyers are the scum of the earth. Fixed it for you. No offense Michael as you are an exception.

          • Anonymous

            It answered a lot of questions for me when I found out the percentage of lawyers that are in powerful places/politics.

      • If I may

        Agreed. Picking between the Red or Blue team gives the illusion of control. It keeps the sheeple in order.
        Besides, most families are too busy working 70 hours a week to stay afloat. Little time is left for protests. If they did, they would quickly be squashed by the powers that be.

        Fatigue and confused is how the 1% want the 99% to be. The plan is going well.

        • Jimmy Cogsdil

          Who programs the Voting Machine? That is the group in charge.

    • Offshoreguy

      Any politician or candidate that is promising voters anything but fidelity to the Constitution should be immediately turned out of office or voted against at the polls.

    • Kim Harrison

      YEP!

  • Mondobeyondo

    My high school guidance counselor was wrong – I should have pursued a career as a major league baseball player…

    • MichaelfromTheEconomicCollapse

      I once dreamed of becoming a professional athlete as well. That didn’t work out for me either.

      Michael

      • Tacitus Gaius of Rome

        Hi, Mr. Michael. I recentlly got an oppurtunity to read your excellent book, “The Beginning of the end”. Like Atlas Shrugged, it shows frightening realizations… That are happening today! Here is the kicker. I grew up in a liberal “Christian” household. How can I, as a 15 year old male, better prepare my family for the upcoming storm?

        • Paula

          Get connected with people in your local area who are involved with food production. You could volunteer at a co-op, a farmer’s market, or even a local farm. Your goal here is to learn everything you can about food production, and to make friends with people who have the resources to produce food locally. If you establish a reputation among the local food folks as a hard worker, it will be much easier for you to find work-for-food exchange in the future, even when things get much worse. You might even be able to turn a volunteer opportunity into an apprenticeship and go on to make a living for yourself that is relatively stable as things get worse. (Plus, farm work gives you big muscles!)

        • Gay Veteran

          broaden your choices of books.
          try “The Age of Reason” by Thomas Paine

    • Mike Smithy

      Mondo, I always wanted to be a Playboy photographer.

    • gsiamne

      I played football at the college level despite loving basketball. While doing that I majored in mathematics and minored in computer science and have worked in the computer field for almost 18 years and am horrified about what is going on. I can talk differential equations with anyone and that causes more problems.

      • ad

        Can you elaborate on what exactly you’re horrified about and how differential equations come into play?

    • ad

      I told my counselor I wanted to be a race car driver. Ahh to be a kid again and dream.

  • JoeD

    It was in Forbes last week that for the first time Walmart disclosed in its financial disclosures that one of the significant risks to its revenue and income that is beyond its control is a reduction in the amount of SNAP and other public assistance benefits.

    Pretty much tells you how upside down things have become.

    • Adrian

      If businesses paid a living wage, there’d be no need for SNAP benefits. Up until the 1970s, a single breadwinner could earn a middle class life in the U.S. Then women had to work because wages stagnated, then families had to rely on credit and debt. Now, the end of the road has been reached. But, as long as a few are making out like bandits, the rest of us can be short-sighted and complain about welfare recipients. No wonder those at the top continue to profit.

      • Anonymous

        Keep the 99% fighting with one another so the 1% continue to get away with anything they want.

      • Hammerstrike

        What is short-sighted is to ignore the reality of the welfare state, generations of people who have lived off the system, and why this Welfare state exist.

        • Adrian

          Welfare state? The US doesn’t have one, and is considered the most free market and liberal out of all the post-industrial democracies. What little there was got gutted by Clinton in 1996 and the system was turned over to the states to be run.

      • David Horace

        Nice sentiments, but they ignore economics.
        The auto makers in Detroit paid a “living wage” for years. Take a look at the city now — more SNAP benefits than most cities. And don’t say that we need to restrict imports — that just impoverishes everyone.
        However, you are totally correct when you say that things changed in the 1970′s — specifically 1971. The creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913 and the creation of a totally fiat, paper dollar in 1971 set in motion the sequence of events that would transfer immense wealth from the middle-class to the bankers, the elite, and the well-connected — and leave most everyone else saddled with debt.

  • markthetruth

    The Middle Class is Expanding !!!

    Only there called Computers and Robots.

    the end…

  • ConcernedAmerican

    The comment below is wise and honest (the comment from the grey box above).

    I remember when the District Attorney of a major city happily lived next door to those without college educations. I also remember when an engineer’s child dated a farmer’s child in America. Now, America seems dangerously close to a Caste system as many white collar people seem to believe that they are better than everyone that is blue collar. Many white collar people refuse to live near blue collar people and refuse to have any blue collar friends, spouses, etc. I fear many people are missing out on very meaningful relationships because so many people judge others based on a degree and a bank account. America was great because we once found strength in our differences. An accountant gladly married a mechanic that was a “soul mate” and they may have stayed happily married for 40 years. Now that some Americans choose a mate by degree status and bank account balance, look at the divorce rate in America. I can’t help but wonder if those things are connected? It seems the days of “All men created equal” are gone. I just heard a news story about a wealthy person that received a very light punishment for the crime that the wealthy person committed. If it had been a poor person, they would have probably received a much more severe punishment. I wonder if our Founding Fathers are shaking their heads as they see a group of wealthy people exalted onve the rest of us? No wonder our Founding Fathers felt it necessary to put “All men created equal” in one of our country’s most important documents. The wealthy are not supposed to receive lighter punishment, or no punishment in America.

    “The richest Americans—the much-talked about 1 percent—are a cloistered class. As the Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz scathingly put it, they “have the best houses, the best educations, the best doctors, and the best lifestyles, but there is one thing that money doesn’t seem to have bought: an understanding that their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live.” The Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel has similarly lamentedthe “skyboxification” of American life, in which “people of affluence and people of modest means lead increasingly separate lives.”

    The substantial and growing gap between the rich and everyone else is increasingly inscribed on our geography. There have always been affluent neighborhoods, gated enclaves, and fabled bastions of wealth like Greenwich, Connecticut; Grosse Pointe, Michigan; Potomac, Maryland; and Beverly Hills, California. But America’s bankers, lawyers, and doctors didn’t always live so far apart from teachers, accountants, and small business owners, who themselves weren’t always so segregated from the poorest, most struggling Americans.”

    • toadsticker

      The doctors, lawyers, professionals, businessmen, public officials and even top level educators have been separating from the general public since the 90′s. Generally, they aren’t among us in public and we don’t interface with them unless we are doing business with them. I caddied at a public course in a small town in the 60′s. All the above played in the men’s league on Wednesday. When the working man started gaining access in the 70′s and 80′s the professional people stayed for awhile, but slowly there numbers dwindled. Now, few play among the working men.
      But, you don’t see the businessmen and professional people out in the community, in the stores or in the restaurants anymore. They used to be on the school boards and city councils and were involved in the communities beyond their business, but hardly anymore. They have distanced themselves from the common man and have little involvement in the communities where they make their living.

      • Hammerstrike

        No doubts they will simply flee to some other countries when their own have been ruined.

        • Priszilla

          The ancestors of most Americans came from a foreign country.

    • Hammerstrike

      Humans are not equal the slightest.

      However, most of these white collars would go down real fast in a meritocratic system.

      Best schools and doctors are no cure for the plague of stupidity.

  • Angry Jesus

    Ever heard of “offshoring”? Mom & Pop can’t exploit the legal or tax loopholes that trans or multinational corporations can. And yes, I’m still angry.

    • Malcolm Reynolds

      I’m a software developer. NOOOOO what’s that. And yes the hell they can.

      If I so decide to update my company’s software on my time and sell it back to them, do you think I’m gonna be sitting at home and rewriting every line of code. HELL NO.

      • Angry Jesus

        You’re right about being able subcontract your software development to a company in India. What you’re not going to be able to do is avoid taxes & violate rights with impunity like a trans or multinational corporation. Unfortunately, you seem to grasp one of the basic rudiments of moneychanging, yet still do not understand it. And yes, I’m still angry.

  • DJohn1

    I agree. The middle class is disappearing.
    The problem is compounding. I remember the strong middle class of the 50s and early 60s. I remember people burning mortgages after a 5 year mortgage expires. They had mortgage parties.
    The economy set up then has been destroyed by a number of factors. Most of all you have a very small number of people rich and a declining middle of the road class of people making good money. The rest of the people are slaving just to get by. Then there is the welfare class of people that are no longer trying to make a living. They are supported by a communistic form of government.
    What is wrong?
    Taxes are basically payed by average Americans fortunate enough to be in the middle class with all that entails. Without those taxes, the government prints money to make up the difference. That money has no value behind it. It is basically stealing by counterfeiting.
    When I was growing up the Unions represented the middle class of this country and negotiated wages so that people had a reasonable standard of living. They negotiated benefits as well as wages. There were abuses. But that union out there kept the companies basically honest in their wages and working conditions of the middle class.
    Right now that is all gone.
    The wages are controlled by the companies period. There are no working rules of fairness to the employee. The companies discard workers whenever they want to without anyone interferring.
    Johnson put us through a ruinous war. Nixon negotiated retail sales with China to save the American standard of living when he had to take us off the gold standard. More recently Bill Clinton sold us down the river with trade agreements. George Bush tried to artificially keep things prosperous by collecting less taxes than are needed to pay the bills, putting us further in debt. Each President reached into the pocket of the common man to do his agendas.
    Meanwhile the rules have changed and the Unions of old are no more. So what exactly does the working man have to bargain with?
    Congress over the last few years sold us all out by not renewing the tax breaks of the Bush Years. SO more and more people fall behind.
    Obama has put us into Obamacare. Each and every one has betrayed the middle class of this country over and over again.
    Well the middle class is going away. The tax base of this country is going with it.
    We have been betrayed by the working class party known as Democrats. The Republicans are coming back into power at the next election. The only thing that remains is to see just how they plan to betray that middle class because they will do it just as much as the party in power if given a free rein.
    And that is the real problem. Neither party wants a middle class thriving in this country. Going by their actions rather than their speeches, neither party has helped the average American get back to financial prosperity. That party that succeeds in turning this around will be in power for the next generation of Americans.
    As usual, I apoligize for such a long post.

    • dooder

      All great empires slowly die away, then a few explode now and then.

    • XSANDIEGOCA

      Should be required reading on every Oped page in the country.

    • KD

      Just got my taxes back from the accountant and we made 10,000 more this year than last year in profit so we got the privilege of paying 30% of that to the government.

      My accountant even had the nerve to try and raise his fee from 225 to 300 this year. After arguing with him and having to hear him whine and complain about his having to pay 9 employees he said he would accept 250 (this was after he already told me the taxes would be 250 when I dropped them off weeks ago and I had said then I wanted to continue to pay the 225 since the taxes were exactly the same as last year with no additional forms or deductions, etc).

      Next year he said my taxes would be 300 and perhaps a little bit more because of Obamacare and the fact we did not sign up for the insurance. More than likely it will be 350 to recoup his supposed loss from this year. BUT I have news for him I will be seeking a new accountant for next year so he will not be getting another dime from us.

      This accountant has revenues of about 2 million dollars. Lives in a almost 400,000 house (which in the midwest is like a mansion) and has the nerve to complain about the rate I expected.

      I mean c’mon!
      We have not had a raise in 7 years and had to scratch and claw every single day of 2013 to earn that extra money. It makes me want to cry thinking about how emotionally draining it was to do and how many times I wanted to just curl up and die because I was scared we would not make it.

      But this is how the rich and upper middle class feel. That they are entitled to keep up their lavish lifestyles while others struggle and work hard to have nothing tangible.

      Even this morning I am still mad thinking about it!

      • Carlos

        Unless your taxes are extremely complicated or you have a business use TurboTax. This is the first year in about 30 years that I’m not doing my own taxes because my wife started a business. And guess what – she’s paying $300 for the taxes.

    • Gay Veteran

      GREAT post.

      as for the 1950s, read “The Golden Era of the 1950s/60s Was an Anomaly, Not the Default Setting” by Charles Hugh Smith:

      “…The nostalgic punditry quite naturally think of this full-employment golden age of their youth as the default setting, i.e. the economy of the 1950s/60s was “normal.” But it wasn’t normal–it was a one-off anomaly, never to be repeated. Consider the backdrop of this Golden Era:

      1. Our industrial competitors had been flattened and/or bled dry in World War II, leaving the U.S. with the largest pool of capital and intact industrial base. Very little was imported from other nations.

      2. The pent-up consumer demand after 15 years of Depression and rationing during 1942-45 drove strong demand for virtually everything, boosting employment and wages.

      3. The Federal government had put tens of millions of people to work (12 million in the military alone) during the war, and with few consumer items to spend money on, these wages piled up into a mountain of savings/capital.

      4. These conditions created a massive pool of qualified borrowers for mortgages, auto loans, etc.

      5. The Federal government guaranteed low-interest mortgages and college education for the 12 million veterans.

      6. The U.S. dollar was institutionalized as the reserve currency, backed by gold at a fixed price.

      7. Oil was cheap–incredibly cheap….”

  • retired22

    I have read posts on political blogs written by simple souls who are completely ignorant of finance & economics,their ideas are childlike.They anguish over whether Clinton will run for President in 2016,Obama’s golf game or the ins & outs of the Republican-Democrat shell game & who will win! These fools don’t understand that none of this will shortly matter,that the political junk the MSM prints is nonsense.It is nonsense because the global economy we are a part of will soon blow up, long before the politicians do whatever they are going to do.The debt is so huge,the entitlements are so expensive,& the leverage is so gigantic that no amount of tricks & mirrors will help.
    Suppose that all of this was a huge card game & we were all handed cards to play.Suppose that 99% of the public were given cards from an ordinary poker deck & their well being depended on how well they played these cards.
    Suppose we were playing against the 1%. Now also suppose that the 1% we were matched against were playing with not poker cards but cards from an altered pinochle deck which had only jokers & all of the jokers were wild!
    Do you believe that under these conditions anyone in the 99% can win the game.

    • inbred jed

      You’re right, a lot of people are too short-sighted.

    • Drud

      The crazy thing is no one would stand for such corruption and unfair practices in games or sports, not for a second, but we have put up with it for a century (or more) in money, where it really affects our lives. We are foolish creatures.

  • Orange Jean

    Just last week you had an article asking if college was a waste of time and money… a lot of people seemed to think it was a waste… yet on your list of those top 10 jobs… the only one that pays a decent salary is the only one that requires a degree. Just sayin’!

    That being said, yes there are some degrees that are a waste. Got to do your home work and make good choices if you plan on going that route.

    • Anonymous

      The game is rigged. That is why the jobs that require degrees pay more.

      • dooder

        You need connections otherwise you won’t get an interview.

        • Orange Jean

          Not necessarily… I am not very good at that networking stuff (not a “people person”), and I am not good at selling, but I’ve still gotten interviews and job offers.

          The difference is I could offer the employer what they wanted needed and then some.

        • Priszilla

          Not necessarily. I’m an hermit, I don’t know anyone here. I still got interviews and finally a job.

          It doesn’t pay much. But then, the living costs are much lower here.

          I intend to save as much as I can and put the savings into house improvement. I bought a house for my parents. They don’t move anymore for a job. I’ll always find refuge there, if things become extremely difficult.

          It’s base camp.

          And we have another base camp in South East Asia, were we bought a hectar of land for fruit trees and rice, to help the family there with some income, but which could also accommodate a house if needed.

          We don’t have kids. Just those from our brothers and sisters. We pay tuition and food and accommodation for their university.

    • Malcolm Reynolds

      Not necessarily. Experience can play into it as well. (ya, I know that’s a catch 22) I have an associates degree and I don’t even put it on my resume. My family is comfortable enough on my income alone.

      • Orange Jean

        You’re right in that there is no guarentee getting a degree will get you a better job.

        But from what you wrote later… its obvious you had the smarts to learn skills that were highly marketable (software developer… not unskilled), then tarted your own business… If you’re good a it and can figure out how to provide a service your clients need it’s obvious that’s why you’ve been able to make a decent living. You made good choices for yourself I’d say.

        Highly skilled people or those with great people skills in some of those same jobs can do well, and there are some lines of work that don’t require college of any kind (plumbers for example) that can pay very well if the person is good at it.

        Consider that Bill Gates, at one time richest guy in the world or something… was a college drop out. My son also in IT, good at it, but no schooling beyond high school.

        But on average, with the list of those top jobs Michael posted… most don’t pay well. I do wish my brother’s girlfriend had gotten her RN; she’s a very hard working and dedicated nurse with an LPN, but doesn’t make any near the money she could make if she’d get the RN.

  • FortuneSeek3rz

    Wait until quantum computing and cyborgs become more common. The unemployment we will have after these two technological breakthroughs will dwarf the advent of the internet.

    • Uh-hUh

      and you wonder why they aren’t closing the Ebola borders?

  • RICHARD

    35,000 a year is good money someone sign me up.

    • DB

      If you and your spouse both make 35000/year, that is darn good money! Nothing to complain about.

  • davidmpark

    Update: We won the right to residential chickens again!!!

    It was a hard fight: about 8 of the progressive-types came to the meeting and made a lot of me-first comments, used misleading “facts”, and sniped at supporters; but they were outnumbered 3:1 in this. Local media wasn’t on our side and we still won with thoroughly researched information. The vote was 4-2 in favor! One of the councilmen who voted no only did that because of a technical issue he wants worked out, but he does support it. Final rules to be made on the 15th.

    Next up is the residential meat rabbits fight which is going well. The Agriculture department claims there’s a law that makes an exception just for this: Utah Code 3-42-3-1(c-d) says that all we need to do is not cause a nuisance and to label it “Not for Sale”. Simple. I also contacted the county health department, and their food inspection department said they don’t regulate that and have no issue with us harvesting rabbits on our property for non-commercial personal use. Which is odd as this same branch told Zoning that they don’t allow it. State Health Department said they have nothing to do with residential livestock and referred me back to State Ag. So, this may be approved also!

    After this is the really hard fight for residential small-scale commercial manufacturing. There are “Cottage Industry” laws that do protect some ventures, but the licensing and fees are a problem. So are the restrictions on what industries are allowed. Looking for ways to argue that to the county and State Legislature, then will send it to municipal for approval. The idea is to free up enough of the regulations so the poor and afflicted that are that way through no fault of their own can have more avenues of income streams to better self-reliance.

    I’m also typing up a lot of how-to pamphlets. The local authorities asked for some info to help the poor and afflicted to help themselves. So I’m writing up all the basic stuff that I’ve done already: the chairs and table, the bunk beds, blankets, gardening basics, homemade tools, cheaper cooking methods; make do and mend stuff. If one can’t afford to go to the stores, they can make their own for much cheaper anyway.

    This collapse can be reversed. I’m fighting it, and have had some success for those who’ve needed it. It’s not enough to complain and argue online – real actions are needed. This is not about extra handouts or taxing the rich to redistribute to the parasites; we are scaling back the laws and regulations that’s committing the actual oppression of the poor and afflicted. The more avenues for extra income streams, the more dependence is diminished. I understand that total independence may be impossible for most of the disabled on these programs; the idea is to give more control over their own lives and to help their caregivers; giving them all a better chance to have a fulfilling life of their own make.

    Give a man a fish, he eats for a day. Teach him to fish, he eats for a lifetime. Teach him to use it up, wear it out; build it strong, build it stout; to make do, or do without – he will thrive!

    • dooder

      Give a man a a gallon jug of Clorox and he can feed a village, well thats what they do in the Philippines.
      Congrats on the chicken fight. The chicken movment is very big these days.

    • Bubba Johnson

      Way to go. Whenever government loses, we win.

      • Adrian

        I don’t think so. When the government shut down, there was no one inspecting our food. People who worked for the gvt got no pay. Let’s say the gvt defaulted on its debt…what do you think the consequences for the rest of us would be?

    • K

      Congrats, well done. You are the proof, that fighting the good fight can still work. It seems so many have given up, before the fight even begins.

      • davidmpark

        Can I go into what I saw a little further?

        I live in a mixed city: suburbs, urban, parts are still undeveloped rural and wilderness. This city is really big – comprised of several county townships that banded together when incorporation took place. The city has over 100,000 residents; most US citizens, some illegals, and some part-time residents.

        Of all this space and all these citizens, the city council was taking their cues from a total of 13 people. These are the stalwart progressives that show up at most council meetings to voice their desires. And from what I can gather, these 13 or so people are part of numerous special interest groups each. And since no one else shows up, the council takes their opinions as a reflection of the city as a whole. 13 people were voicing for over 100,000 people.

        That’s how this oppression takes place. This is how they get away with it. Bring in 50 or so of your neighbors who support what you want to do, and they will be outnumbered every time!

    • Priszilla

      Good Job!

  • El mico

    When a business, large or small, sacks all their employees and ships production off shore to turn profits into mega profits, do they not realize they are also killing off their market base?

    • Priszilla

      There are still savings and there is taxmoney being paid as benefits, and there is the printing press.

      Those employers don’t need much more to eat than the unemployed. They can pay any price for anything else to get rid of their fiat money, making everything more expensive for everybody else.

  • Spy#1

    The only way to survive is to become self reliant. Do not place any faith in a job unless you are high up on the food chain with generous stock options and a golden parachute. It’s sad to say, but the corporate CEO’s, board members, and major stock holders have been planning this for quite awhile.

    • K2

      And how do you propose people become self reliant? Grow chickens? Not every body has a farm or a big backyard to do that.

      Having a job is ‘self reliance’ as you dont depend on the govts or your parents or your spouces money.

    • K2

      If you want to do it, go ahead, but dont give wrong advice to people.

      People should do whats best for them. Growing food or livestock if it suits them more or learning a trade/getting a degree in a field with enough jobs.

  • Steve

    Mike your entire article could have been portrayed in video by the 1973 movie Soylent Green. 41 years ago but none the less the George Orwell of movies.

    There is no middle class in this movie. The “protesting” public is scoop up with front loaders, people can go to “final needs’ centers to commit suicide because life is no longer worth living, etc.

    Watch it. And ask yourself if this is not where we are going.

    • El Pollo de Oro

      “Soylent Green is made of PEOPLE.”-Charlton Heston

      Great movie. I saw “Soylent Green” as a kid, and these days, the things depicted in that film aren’t looking so far-fetched.

  • Rob

    Yeah, things are tough, no doubt. I have a Master’s and I’m working odd jobs during the week and security on weekends. I’m married and my wife doesn’t work. Obviously, we aren’t in a good situation. Jobs are coming back but a lot of them are in low paying occupations. Middle management jobs, manufacturing and other middle class jobs used to be the bread and butter of this country. Unfortunately, a lot of them are gone with little hope of them coming back. The job recovery has been slow and painful for a lot of people.

  • Leigh

    As always, an interesting and thought provoking article. I always get my back up when my parents or one of their friends insinuates that I choose to work, rather than be with my small children at home. I don’t think many from that generation realizes that to achieve the same quality of life from the 60s and 70s, a household needs two income earners. We own a home, have two vehicles, a camper and a snowmobile and go on vacation once a year, dance lessons for my daughter, hockey for my son. It is nothing extravagant, it is the EXACT same things I had and did as a child…except growing up my mom didn’t have to work to achieve that lifestyle. Now both my husband and I need to work to give the same opportunities to our kids. My son is 5 a hockey registration was 1200$. We just booked some camping for the summer and one night in a camp ground is 42$. That is crazy. Not to mention that clamshell of strawberries runs about 4.99 right now. I don’t choose to work, I need to work. Would I rather be at home with my kids, you bet…but I also want them to have the experiences and opportunities that I had. Every generation wants more for their children than they had…but it seems like this will not be possible my generation raising our kids.

    • Econ 101

      When I was growing up in the 60s and 70s my Mom didn’t have to work either.
      We owned our own home—- but it had one bathroom for the 6 of us and no AC.
      We owned 2 cars — both 5+ years old.
      We went camping — hiked into the woods and set up a tent. Cost $0
      I had guitar lessons– not in a fancy studio but from the older kid down the street.
      We took a vacation now and then — stayed in cramped motels, not in a fancy resort.
      We ate fresh blackberries everyday for weeks— picked for free in the woods around our house.
      It’s all relative. People today want convienience, luxury, and immediate gratification. You got to be willing to pay for that.

    • DB

      I’ll bet your home/vehicles/camper/etc are NOT the exact same, as you state. I suspect the house is bigger, possibly has central vac and a/c, larger bedrooms, more bathrooms, etc. How big is your TV(s) compared to theirs? Did they have cable/satellite, multiple computers/tablets, and smart phones? (These aren’t necessities although Internet access nearly is) The vehicles: yours very likely have more options (options! not necessities) than your parents’ did- power windows/seats/mirrors, a/c, cruise, maybe even heated and cooled seats and heated and cooled cupholders. My point is, the new normal is to expect to afford things which were not even available back in the 70′s. If you buy the modern equivalent of what your parents had, apples to apples, you do not need two incomes. This is a fact: our five-person family is easily supported by my single income in the trades, as was my father’s family. IF we wanted to keep up with the Jones’ my wife would have to work too, but why would we have kids just so somebody else can raise them.

  • Coffeedrinker

    Get a college education (or its equal) so that you can understand what is going on around you. But first set aside some time to study the–the bible–because the only way out of this is to be guided by the Holy Spirit.
    Your human experience can be guided by your connection to God. Get connected.

    • zuma

      You do not need the bible to be connected to god and the energy and life that is all around us. There are billions of people on the planet and all have their belief about who and what god is. What is those following any of the major religions are wrong? What if it something even more beautiful and powerful that was always inside us and never in a book or a building?

    • anonymous

      Is this a joke? There are some that have college degrees that can make others wonder how they even get themselves dressed. Meanwhile, many that have never been to college are geniuses.

  • Loan Agent

    As a Mortgage Loan Officer, I see where the jobs with money are:
    NOT:
    Lawyers — the last two I did loans for averaged $35,000 a year.
    Realtors — the last two I did loans for averaged $11,000 a year.
    One common thing among people I have done loans for that are making good money– they travel.
    Traveling Nurse — $112,000
    Traveling Welder $50 per hour — $85,000 / yr for 8 months.
    Over -the-Road Trucker — $82,000
    Generator Rebuilder — $138,000 for 8 months on the road.

    • Sandbagger

      Yep. Give up time with your family in order to afford for them to have a decent life. It’s between a rock and a hard place, that’s for sure.

      Reminds me of Harry Chapin’s song,

      Cat’s in the Cradle:

      My child arrived just the other day
      He came to the world in the usual way
      But there were planes to catch and bills to pay
      He learned to walk while I was away
      And he was talkin’ ‘fore I knew it, and as he grew
      He’d say “I’m gonna be like you dad
      You know I’m gonna be like you”

      And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
      Little boy blue and the man on the moon
      When you comin’ home dad?
      I don’t know when, but we’ll get together then son
      You know we’ll have a good time then

      My son turned ten just the other day
      He said, “Thanks for the ball, Dad, come on let’s play
      Can you teach me to throw”, I said “Not today
      I got a lot to do”, he said, “That’s ok”
      And he walked away but his smile never dimmed
      And said, “I’m gonna be like him, yeah
      You know I’m gonna be like him”

      And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
      Little boy blue and the man on the moon
      When you comin’ home son?
      I don’t know when, but we’ll get together then son
      You know we’ll have a good time then

      Well, he came home from college just the other day
      So much like a man I just had to say
      “Son, I’m proud of you, can you sit for a while?”
      He shook his head and said with a smile
      “What I’d really like, Dad, is to borrow the car keys
      See you later, can I have them please?”

      And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
      Little boy blue and the man on the moon
      When you comin’ home son?
      I don’t know when, but we’ll get together then son
      You know we’ll have a good time then

      I’ve long since retired, my son’s moved away
      I called him up just the other day
      I said, “I’d like to see you if you don’t mind”
      He said, “I’d love to, Dad, if I can find the time
      You see my new job’s a hassle and kids have the flu
      But it’s sure nice talking to you, Dad
      It’s been sure nice talking to you”

      And as I hung up the phone it occurred to me
      He’d grown up just like me
      My boy was just like me

      And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon
      Little boy blue and the man on the moon
      When you comin’ home son?
      I don’t know when, but we’ll get together then son
      You know we’ll have a good time then

      • JWHacket

        For the most part, I’m not an emotional person, but that song hit home the very first time I heard it as a teenager. It’s one of the main reasons I made up my mind to develop a close relationship with my son, whom I had when I was 45. He’s now 11 and I make every basketball game, every karate class and tournament, and every school function I possibly can. It’s made a huge positive impact on the both of us. He’s the most important part of my life and I remind him of that fact on a regular basis. I just wish I could thank Harry Chapin.

  • K2

    Michael, you always see people should prepare.

    What do you mean by that?

    • K2

      you always ‘say’

  • ian

    then why is it there are countless wealthy people in this country? Why is it that most people i know make more than 35., 000, a year?

  • LogisticsMonster

    Michael, I am sure you have heard numerous similar stories, but my family and I sold almost everything we owned for pennies on the dollar to move from one state to another just to find a job and put food on the table. We are doing better now (eating 3 meals a day) and preparing. Keep up the great writing and broadcasting. People need to know that it will crash when TPTB have all their ducks in a row.

  • death

    You’re all lazy for sitting here complaining and whining about things you cannot change…haven’t you been told by the sheeple that none of this matters? It’s all YOUR FAULT, and YOU have to DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT!!! Oh, can’t find a job? Well GO BACK TO SCHOOL! TRY HARDER!! YOU’RE LAZY FOR GRADUATING COLLEGE AT 21 YEARS OLD!!! Stop whining about reality, and ask “what can I DO ABOUT THIS MYSELF”. If you haven’t received this speech from at least two or three people whom you previously thought cared about you, then you haven’t lived the NEW American dream.

    • El Pollo de Oro

      Death: Americans blame the victim as a defense mechanism because they don’t like to face the possibility that it can also happen to them. “You have a masters degree and are making minimum wage? Well what did you study, lesbian history? Oh, you have an MBA? Well, if you had gotten your MBA from Princeton or Yale instead of Columbia or Temple or Northwestern, you wouldn’t be in this position.” Of course, they’ll be singing a different tune when they’re the ones on the chopping block and wind up living in favela slums.

  • Adrian

    That’s not surprising, considering the fact that unions have been destroyed in the U.S. Decline in wages perfectly mirrors the decline of union membership.

    • Scared Economist

      The Unions destroyed themselves. The parasites ate too much of the hosts until they became too weak and died.

      • Adrian

        What nonsense. Reagan destroyed the unions. Now the corporate parasites (just look at how they own our elected officials) are destroyed the environment to make the planet uninhabitable.

  • Adrian

    Why are gas prices rising so much, considering all we hear about is these new sources of oil that have been discovered that will allow us to continue to have access to oil, and that the U.S. is now exporting oil again? If this is so, shouldn’t prices fall?

    • Scared Economist

      If the US doesn’t export oil, the only thing left China needs from us, then China will stop buying US Bonds and allowing the government to keep providing EBT, Section 8, and Obamaphones.

      • xander cross

        and yet, the vast majority of people using those services are white people.

  • Drud

    Also, the “screw Walmart” crowd are the same one’s who praise the welfare system, without realizing of course, that most welfare dollars end up bolstering Walmart’s profits, all of it, of course, at the expense of the middle class.

  • Drud

    I drove through Sausalilto a couple of years ago and my though was “Buy a mansion and get a free yaucht.” It is indeed a haven of the.01%-ers.

  • Priszilla

    These problems can easily be avoided by either being born a millionaire, or becoming one.

  • piccadillybabe

    We have reached peak growth in 2011 in the world and now we are on a slow decline. It’s hard for those who did not see this coming and kept on buying bigger homes and having more kids. This decline we are in is hard for anyone much less families. It would be nice if there was more support out there for people but they just keep cutting support programs so many feel isolated and alone. We had so much in America, good jobs, nice homes, education, vacations and retirement savings, a future with opportunity. It’s hard to see the decline but we have to see it as the “new normal.” Smart people will be able to make lemonade out of the lemons but the rest of us will struggle to make any sense of it.

    • JJ

      It’s currency manipulation, that’s why Wallstreet is growing and most people aren’t seeing any prosperity, socialism ALWAYS misallocates resources. The vast majority has gone to bankers, and related industries, not to people that manufacture or produce things. Without a solid basis for this economy new middle class jobs will not be created. -JS

  • JahRW

    Unfortunately, I get the feeling that crap has to hit the fan, and millions of Americans are gonna have to suffer harshly before things can change. We’ve created such selfish, and head-in-the-sand society, where many Americans can sympathize with each other. The media and super rich have done a great job distracting most of Americans. Their divide and conquer tactics are working. They divide us by race, religion, class, gender, politics, all in the name of not blaming the real enemy of all Americans.

    Michael provide us with statistics everyday with a clear picture that America is close to an economic crisis. In the name of greed, they have eliminated the middle class. The same people that call for the elimination of welfare programs, also support globalization, which ship good paying jobs overseas. The same people that call for immigration reform, ignore the porous border, so they can work for slave wages, so they don’t have to pay us livable wages. It’s a vicious game, and the only way I can see things getting better is for things to get really bad. It pains me to say that, because that means we all gonna suffer. But maybe for the benefits of our children, we have to go through it.

  • Founder Church

    The definition of many words have changed to suit people’s selfish purposes. Former Low Class people and Jobs are now described as Middle Class for example.

  • Nicknakthetruthspeaker

    What would happen if there was a crisis tomorrow.? It s already bad today…

  • Kent Harris

    The church should take a more active role but it has abandoned its responsibility and as such we continue to see it being played out.

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  • Sandbagger

    Praying for that little boy!

    Recently a “mother” in Pittsburgh tried to kill two of her three sons by sitting on them in the bathtub. She said “crazy voices” told her to sit on her 3 and 6 year old sons after she had sent her 7 year old son off to school that morning. Sadly, the three year old is dead and his six year old brother in critical condition.

    This is what the neighbors said of the family:

    Word that the two little boys were found unresponsive stunned neighbors
    in the quiet, upscale bedroom community about 20 miles north of
    Pittsburgh. They described the family as religious and said Schlemmer
    was a stay-at-home mom whose husband, Mark, was working at the time.

    The lack of money wasn’t the problem, apparently. Abuse happens even in the upper classes.

  • Ken Lowder

    Actually the mother in the malnourished case may be innocent. He ex husband had custody of the son and she rarely saw him. The father and kid were visiting when the dad and her older son. Got in and argument. That’s what brought in the police to find the poor kid. As for the closet there was no way that kid could have fit into that confined space. Her lawyer showed a bunk bed where the kid slept when he used to be able to stay over.

  • Dabron from Vancouver

    David Johanson

  • anonymous

    Since it is Spring, many homes are doing a Spring cleaning. I found paycheck stubs from 16 years ago. I make about the same amount now as I did 16 years ago. Yet, the cost of living has soared in those 16 years. Has anyone else had a similar experience?

  • anonymous

    I do not see anything wrong with someone being a janitor for their entire lifetime if that is what they enjoy doing and choose to do. I do believe a 30 year janitor should be paid more than a1 year janitor. Blue collar jobs are hard work. I believe that the harder the work, the higher the pay should be. So, if someone has to be concerned about needing a back surgery because they work so hard, that person should make more money than the person that sits in a temperature controlled office all day, or spends the day entertaining friends/clients on the golf course, in my opinion. The more physically demanding a job is, the more it should pay. The more a job steals one’s health, the more that job should pay.

    I think it is wrong to expect everyone to go to college just so they can make a wage that they can live on. People are individuals, and individuals are all different. I think society should encourage the best blue collar workers to remain blue collar workers by paying them wages that encourage them to continue to master their blue collar profession. Some people are excellent carpenters, and they should be encouraged to continue in carpentry by being paid good wages. Why is everyone expected to go to college nowadays? Why is college and a degre being used as a measure of value/worth to society ?

  • JoeThePimpernel

    The real disgrace is that half the people in this country earn less than the median income.

    We should be ashamed of ourselves.

    • Eric Johnson

      Yup. And half are of below average intelligence. And half are below average height while have are above average weight.

  • Dewey Olsen

    The Struggle within America—Isaiah Saw It All!
    by Avraham Gileadi Ph.D.

    Many regard Isaiah’s prophecy as a sealed book. Who does it address, only people in the past? A key to this mystery exists in the linear and synchronous structures that govern the book of Isaiah. These enable us to read it as a prophecy about the past but also as a prediction of the future. The book of Isaiah, in other words, serves a twofold purpose. Without taking anything away from what happened in the past, it uses the past as an allegory of the future. In that case, persons and nations of Isaiah’s day typify ones who perform similar roles at the end of the world. The names of past persons and nations function as codenames for their endtime counterparts.

    The importance of understanding Isaiah’s message increases daily as world events line up like planets for the fulfillment of his prophecy. Under the codename “Egypt”—the great superpower of Isaiah’s day—America is predicted to suffer spiritual decline, political ineptitude, economic collapse, internal anarchy, and invasion by a foreign military world power from the North—a latter-day “Assyria.” On the other hand, a community of covenanters in “Egypt” will turn back to Jehovah,
    who will send them a savior and deliver them. In the end, at the commencement of the millennial age, America will again become “my people”—a covenant people of God (Isaiah 19).

    5. 20. 2010

  • Dewey Olsen

    End-Time “Egypt”—A Superpower in Decline
    by Avraham Gileadi Ph.D.

    Isaiah’s use of types of ancient world powers that foreshadow End-Time ones extends to the great superpower Egypt. As with all nations and persons who appear in the book of Isaiah, their true identity emerges when we observe how Isaiah characterizes them, not when we apply historical or archaeological data, though at times that may help. In searching the world today for a nation that matches Isaiah’s description of “Egypt,” the sole candidate is America. That connection is further strengthened by the fact that God’s people anciently dwelt in Egypt, that Joseph ruled Egypt, and that the birthright tribe of Ephraim sprang from Joseph and Asenath, an Egyptian woman.

    Isaiah’s “Egypt,” however, is a superpower in decline: “The ministers of Zoan have been foolish, the officials of Noph deluded; the heads of state have led Egypt astray. Jehovah has permeated them with a spirit of confusion; they have misled Egypt in all that it does, causing it to stagger like a drunkard into his vomit. . . . Manufacturers of combed linen and weavers of fine fabrics will be dismayed. The textile workers will know despair, and all who work for wages suffer distress. . . . I will stir up the Egyptians against the Egyptians; they will fight brother against brother and neighbor against neighbor, city against city and state against state” (Isaiah 19:2, 9–10, 13–14).

    11. 16. 2011

  • Steve

    This article is all screwed up. First, I know very few people who’s primary source of income is on that list (excluding of course the nurses) except teenagers and kids going to college. If they are on that list, it’s simply because they failed out of school and can qualify for nothing more. Second, even truckers, who I believe are in the category “Freight and Material Movers” make more than what they’re purporting here. Most likely, these numbers are starting salaries or some derivative thereof. Third, These numbers are for individual earners. In other words, if I’m a “Material Mover” and my wife is a “Secretary” our combined household income is going to be closer to $60,000 not the 20k-35k this article makes it seem. On top of all that, the shear numbers of this article make it seem like a majority of American workers make this dismal 20k-35k, which is also untrue. The Average Wage in the US is closer to $45k. I personally make about $55k (that’s in my day job; I also work two part time jobs, not because I must, but because I like the little extra income) and I’m not even that well educated nor do I work in some glamorous field. That illuminates another fault with this article. I have 3 jobs, although I would never work either of the second two as a primary source of income. Is the Govt, and this author, looking at those two jobs as separate workers? Do I count as 3 different workers in their tabulations? It’s quite possible. This article is so full of holes it makes me want to hurl.

  • Rascally Rabid

    This hit home over the weekend. There was a Wall Street Journal article listing 381 cities from the most to least expensive to live in here in the US. Denver, Colorado was the 55th most expensive place to live. Our daughter teaches there, is single, and makes a whopping $33,000 per year. In August her insurance premium will rise 12%, thanks to effin OBAMACARE. Yeah, these teachers are really overpaid. Did I mention she has a teaching degree from the one university in Colorado that has a degree program rated as ‘Exemplary” by the Colorado Department of Education? Yep, that degree pays as well as a degree from any college in Colorado. And she is finishing her 5th year teaching. Yippee!!!!! SARCASM

  • Kim Harrison

    hahaha

  • David Horace

    “Overall, an astounding 59 percent of all American workers bring home less than $35,000 a year in wages.”
    Nope, they “bring home” less due to SS, Medicare, withholding, contributions to major med, etc. In some cases, it is offset a little by the child credit and EITC.

  • Dewey Olsen

    The Struggle within America—Isaiah Saw It All!
    by Avraham Gileadi Ph.D.

    Many regard Isaiah’s prophecy as a sealed book. Who does it address, only people in the past? A key to this mystery exists in the linear and synchronous structures that govern the book of Isaiah. These enable us to read it as a prophecy about the past but also as a prediction of the future. The book of Isaiah, in other words, serves a twofold purpose. Without taking anything away from what happened in the past, it uses the past as an allegory of the future. In that case, persons and nations of Isaiah’s day typify ones who perform similar roles at the end of the world. The names of past persons and nations function as codenames for their endtime counterparts.

    The importance of understanding Isaiah’s message increases daily as world events line up like planets for the fulfillment of his prophecy. Under the codename “Egypt”—the great superpower of Isaiah’s day—America is predicted to suffer spiritual decline, political ineptitude, economic collapse, internal anarchy, and invasion by a foreign military world power from the North—a latter-day “Assyria.” On the other hand, a community of covenanters in “Egypt” will turn back to Jehovah,
    who will send them a savior and deliver them. In the end, at the commencement of the millennial age, America will again become “my people”—a covenant people of God (Isaiah 19).

    5. 20. 2010

  • Dewey Olsen

    The book of Isaiah—Blueprint of Our Time
    by Avraham Gileadi Ph.D.

    What sets the book of Isaiah apart from all other prophetic writings is its all-inclusiveness in depicting an End-Time scenario. More complete in its portrayal of that time than even apocalyptic writings such as Daniel and Revelation, it spells out a great confluence of events to which humanity may look forward. Using Israel’s ancient history as an allegory of the end of the world, it predicts the future by drawing on events of the past. Only a prophet–poet with extraordinary literary skills could have predicted “the end” based on the world’s beginnings (Isaiah 46:10). Only a visionary who saw both time periods could have crafted such a prophetic masterpiece.

    While the book of Isaiah’s apocalyptic message accords with Jewish tradition, and while literary structures provide proof of its twofold applicability—Isaiah’s day and the end of the world—it still requires a leap of faith to believe that this is indeed a handbook for our time. For one thing, it may mean discarding much or all of what we have been taught. Isaiah foresees this confusion when he speaks of the deaf “hearing” and the blind “seeing” the words of his book. Only then will “they who erred in spirit gain understanding and they who murmured accept instruction” (Isaiah 29:18, 24). Fortunately, not all of God’s people fall in that category (Isaiah 66:2, 5).

    10. 12. 2011

  • Dewey Olsen

    End-Time “Egypt”—A Superpower in Decline
    by Avraham Gileadi Ph.D.

    Isaiah’s use of types of ancient world powers that foreshadow End-Time ones extends to the great superpower Egypt. As with all nations and persons who appear in the book of Isaiah, their true identity emerges when we observe how Isaiah characterizes them, not when we apply historical or archaeological data, though at times that may help. In searching the world today for a nation that matches Isaiah’s description of “Egypt,” the sole candidate is America. That connection is further strengthened by the fact that God’s people anciently dwelt in Egypt, that Joseph ruled Egypt, and that the birthright tribe of Ephraim sprang from Joseph and Asenath, an Egyptian woman.

    Isaiah’s “Egypt,” however, is a superpower in decline: “The ministers of Zoan have been foolish, the officials of Noph deluded; the heads of state have led Egypt astray. Jehovah has permeated them with a spirit of confusion; they have misled Egypt in all that it does, causing it to stagger like a drunkard into his vomit. . . . Manufacturers of combed linen and weavers of fine fabrics will be dismayed. The textile workers will know despair, and all who work for wages suffer distress. . . . I will stir up the Egyptians against the Egyptians; they will fight brother against brother and neighbor against neighbor, city against city and state against state” (Isaiah 19:2, 9–10, 13–14).

    11. 16. 2011

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